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Address

Mailing Address:

Mecklenburg County Public Health
249 Billingsley Road
Charlotte, NC 28211

Office Location:


Mecklenburg County Public Health
249 Billingsley Road
Charlotte, NC 28211

MAP

HOW ARE WE DOING?

Hours: Mon-Fri  8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Contact

Please do not send confidential information
via email.


704-336-4700

Key Initiatives

​MPX (monkeypox)



MPX vaccinations are available at MCPH clinic locations. Click the button below or call 980-314-9400, option 4, to make an appointment or walk in any time during business hours to get the vaccine.
MPX Vaccination Appointments
Click to Schedule Online

2022 MPX Outbreak: What You Need to Know

In early 2022, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) started tracking multiple cases of MPX (pronounced "em-pox" or "monkeypox") that have been reported in several countries that don't normally report MPX, including the United States. Some counties in North Carolina have reported cases, including Mecklenburg County. Get the most current information about the global outbreak from the CDC Website, and get information about the outbreak in North Carolina from the NC Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Website.

MPX Case Numbers, September 30, 2022
​Mecklenburg County
​North Carolina 
​211
​566


Risk to the general public is low. The MPX virus is spread through close, often skin-to-skin, contact with an infected person. Being aware of symptoms in others and practicing good hygiene and safer sex are the best ways to avoid infection.

Most people will recover from MPX on their own, although it can cause severe illness and death. There is no approved treatment for MPX, but antiviral medications are being given in severe cases. The JYNNEOS vaccine is available for high-risk adults who do not currently have MPX.

  • If you have been exposed to a person with MPX, contact a health care provider as soon as possible. You may be eligible for the vaccine.
  • If you think you might have MPX and have the symptoms listed below WITHOUT a new, unexplained skin rash, isolate for 72 hours. If a rash develops, get tested. If your test is negative, you may get vaccinated.
  • If you think you might have MPX and have the symptoms listed below WITH a new, unexplained skin rash, avoid close contact with other people and contact a health care provider immediately to be tested. If your test is negative, you may get vaccinated.

Symptoms

The following are common symptoms:

  • Fever and/or chills
  • Headache and/or body aches
  • Swollen lymph nodes (tender lumps near the neck, jaw, armpits, and groin)
  • Exhaustion
  • A skin rash on any part of the body, including the genitals, with lesions (sores)
    • Rash can be as small as one or two bumps or cover the entire body
    • Lesions can look like bumps, warts, pimples, sores, or scabs

The illness typically lasts for 2 to 4 weeks, during which the skin lesions will change in shape and size before scabbing over and falling off. The person is considered contagious until all the lesions have healed and new skin is intact.


images of sores and lesions on fingers, shoulder, hands
up close images of lesions and sores

See more images of MPX rash on the CDC Website.


Protect Yourself

The MPX virus can enter the body through
  • skin-to-skin contact with the rash, scabs, or body fluids of an infected person or
  • saliva and respiratory droplets of an infected person during intimate, face-to-face contact.

Practice the following to protect yourself and others:
  • Avoid intimate contact, including sexual contact, with anyone who has symptoms.
    • Talk with your sexual partners about any recent illness and be aware of new or unexplained rash on your body or your partners’ bodies.
    • If you or your sexual partners have recently been sick, currently feel sick, or have a new or an unexplained rash, do not have sex and see a healthcare provider.
  • After physical contact with someone whose status you don’t know, wash your hands and any surface the person touched and avoid touching your face.
    • Be aware of new symptoms, including a skin rash anywhere on your body, and seek a health care provider and avoid physical contact with others if symptoms appear.


Vaccine is Available for High-Risk Individuals 

The JYNNEOS MPX vaccine is now available to high-risk individuals aged 18 and older. The FREE vaccine can prevent illness or lead to less severe symptoms if given within 2 weeks after exposure to the MPX virus.
 
Currently, the vaccine is being offered at no cost to adults 18 years of age and older who self-idenitfy as high risk according to any of the following criteria:
  • You had close contact in the past 2 weeks with someone who has been diagnosed with MPX.
  • You are a sexually active gay or bisexual man or a man or transgender person who has sex with men or transgender individuals.
  • You had sexual contact in the past 90 days with gay or bisexual men or men or transgender individuals who have sex with men.
  • You are living with HIV, taking medication to prevent HIV (PrEP), or were diagnosed with syphilis in the past 90 days.

People who have MPX should NOT get vaccinated. People who have recovered are expected to have long-term immunity at this time and are not likely to benefit from vaccination.
 
Please note that supply is limited. When vaccine appointments are not available, you will be paced on a waitlist.
  

Resources

If you have questions, please contact our hotline at 980-314-9400, option 4, Monday - Friday, 8:00am - 5:00pm.

CDC:MPX and Safer Sex La viruela símica o del mono y las relaciones sexuales más seguras

NC DHHS:MPX: Quick Facts Virus de la viruela símica: Datos breves

NC DHHS:MPX: What You Need to Know Virus de la viruela símica: Lo que necesitas saber

MCPH:MPX in the United States: What You Need to Know La viruela del mono en los Estados Unidos: Qué debería saber

MCPH:MPX Provider Checklist


History of MPX

MPX (also called "monkeypox" because it was first discovered in monkeys in 1958), is a rare disease caused by an orthopox virus usually found in West and Central Africa. In the United Sates, it is most often found in small mammals like rats, mice, squirrels, rabbits, and prairie dogs. The first outbreak of MPX in the United States was reported in 2003 among people who got sick after coming into contact with infected pet prairie dogs. Historically, most cases of MPX occurred after a person was exposed to an infected wild animal or animal product. Recent cases, however, have resulted from person-to-person contact.


More Information

Frequently Asked Questions from NC DHHS
NC DHHS MPX site
CDC MPX site
World Health Organization MPX site


Address

Mailing Address:

Mecklenburg County Public Health
249 Billingsley Road
Charlotte, NC 28211

Office Location:


Mecklenburg County Public Health
249 Billingsley Road
Charlotte, NC 28211

MAP

HOW ARE WE DOING?

Hours: Mon-Fri  8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Contact

Please do not send confidential information
via email.


704-336-4700

Key Initiatives